Staff Picks

The staff here at Sundance Books and Music shares a common passion for reading, listening and discovering. One of the best things about being a member of the Sundance staff is the conversations we get to have with our amazing, diverse customers every day. We love hearing about the books and music that you're excited about, and getting to offer some recommendations of our own too.

 

Be sure to check back regularly to find out about the books and music that our staff can't wait to share with you.

This week, check out selections from Emily, Mackenzie, Erica, and Angel:

 

 

 

                                                 

Emily

     

 

The Lightouse Keeper's Daughter
by Hazel Gaynor

"The Lighthouse Keeper’s Daughter" is a thrilling,
emotional intergenerational

story about two young women
trying to figure out how they fit into their worlds.
The characters must adapt to the unforeseen
consequences of their choices, struggle
to regain control over their lives, and decide what
they value most between duty and desire.     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

                                                                

The Blind Assassin
by Margaret Atwood

"The Blind Assassin" had a visceral effect on me.
The layers, the place, the people-- everything
is flawed and kind of wonderful. I grieved the
fact that this book had an ending. Read slowly.

Erica            

Snow White
by Matt Phelan

This graphic novel retelling of the 
classic story is set in 1930s New York. 
Mostly drawn in black and white, the 
strategic splashes of color enhance the 
plot but don't overshadow it. Phelan 
does an amazing job modernizing 
the story without losing its heart. 
Angel                                                            

Autumn
by Karl Ove Knausgaard

Knausgaard's seasonal quartet describes seemingly
mundane objects in the world through his eyes
directed to his unborn daughter.
With lengthy sentences and even lengthier paragraphs, it
is easy to get lost in his works.
I believe the bite-size passages
detailing each object or activity contrast well to his
long sentences. I love being able to read a section,
put the book down, and come back to it later.
Knausgaard's writing style is not for everyone, but I definitely enjoy it.